Zone-00

Welcome to Kuriousity

News, reviews and features with a focus on manga, self-published works and a Canadian perspective. Enjoy fulfilling your Kuriousity!

SITE RETIRED - Thank you for the years of support and readership!

Reviews

Review: Chobits (Complete Series)

Manga-ka: CLAMP
Publisher: Tokyopop
Rating: Older Teen (16+)
Released: April 2002 – October 2003
Volumes: 8Synopsis: “Chi isn’t your average humanoid computer. She can’t do word processing, she can’t connect to the net, and she’s incapable of interfacing with other persocoms… but when the hapless, technophobic Hideki rescues her from the scrap heap and takes her home, he finds that she may be more advanced than her childlike behavior lets on…”

Chobits begins with introducing readers to Hideki, a country boy who finds life in the city isn’t as easy as he’d hoped as he battles rent and schoolwork in attempts to get into college. Struggling to make ends meet and doomed in the ways of women (despite his kind landlady and cute co-worker), it’s no wonder he’s down in the dumps. One night he finds a Persocom, a personalized computer in the shape of a human, lying abandoned in the trash. Believing it’s his lucky day, as Persocoms are very expensive, he takes the female computer home with him only to be confronted with some unexpected results.

The focus of the story stays mainly on Hideki and his new Persocom, Chi. He discovers that she is no ordinary Persocom, one that could possess extraordinary and dangerous powers past her cute and spacy appearance. It’s a balance between the drama of the sci-fi-ish revelations and the drama of everyday life as secondary characters fill the pages along with Hideki and Chi. Some of these characters include Hideki’s school friend, Shinbo (with his adorable laptop Persocom, Sumomo), Hideki’s busty and sweet co-worker, Yumi, and the young prodigy, Minoru, who aids Hideki in the search for information on Chi’s origin.

Along with the numerous romantic endeavours between the characters, there are also the ‘protaganists’, two Persocoms who’re keeping an eye on Chi, ready to deal with her if the need arises. They, along with some neat revelations that CLAMP fans will especially enjoy, add to the numerous different elements that work together to make Chobits an entertaining manga experience. I’ve reread it time and time again and always find I get something different from it, from mushy sighs of romance to more practical ponderings of the future of advanced humanoid robots (and less than practical thoughts on the cuteness factor of the little laptops!). The use of a simple in-book storybook to mask deeper meaning is also an interesting add-in and I thought it made a good branch between Chi’s naive nature and the more complex emotional meanings CLAMP intended the story to explore.

Humour is also another strong element of the series, most often at Hideki’s expense. As a title aimed at a more mature audience, Hideki’s sexual frustrations are ever plaguing and having an adorable, scantily clad roommate makes him believably unnerved. His nervous ramblings and straightforward honesty make him both an amusing and likable lead character.

After eight volumes, the ending ties itself up neatly, though at times feels almost too sugary sweet and perhaps a bit unrealistic in certain regards (past the Persocom element of course). None the less it has a memorable finale that’s dramatic tension eases out to warm the hearts and does so successfully.

The art style used by CLAMP for Chobits is as eye-catching and attractive as fans are accustomed. The proportions are slightly exaggerated, as is common in their books, while the detail is toned down for a more simple appearance. The line art has a unique sketchy look, which helps to accentuate the flowing (which Chi does quite a bit). I love how Hideki’s lively antics are shown with his exaggerated movements and comedic expressions.

After eight volumes, Chobits earns its praises by being a funny, dramatic and overall heart warming tale of love, loss and acceptance. It explores numerous themes that make it more than just the sum of its pretty artwork and I highly recommend it to both CLAMP fans and casual readers.

Review written June 8, 2008 by Lissa Pattillo
Books purchased from indepedent comic book store, Wilkies Wonderful World of Comics


Volume One


Manga-ka: CLAMP
Publisher: Tokyopop
Rating: Older Teen (16+)
Released: April 2002

Synopsis:
“Chi isn’t your average humanoid computer. She can’t do word processing, she can’t connect to the net, and she’s incapable of interfacing with other persocoms … but when the hapless, technophobic Hideki rescues her from the scrap heap and takes her home, he finds that she may be more advanced than her childlike behavior lets on…”


Volume Two


Manga-ka: CLAMP
Publisher: Tokyopop
Rating: Older Teen (16+)
Released: July 2002

Synopsis: “Hideki’s luck with girls seems to be turning around. First, his sexy test-prep teacher asks to sleep over, then the landlady starts doing him favors, and even the really cute girl from work goes out with him. Chi continues to grow and learn and she hopes that Hideki will be her one true love. She’ll do anything for Hideki, so when he tells her he’s low on money, she takes a job. But when Hideki finds out what she’s been paid to do, HE’LL do anything to bring her home.”


Volume Three


Manga-ka: CLAMP
Publisher: Tokyopop
Rating: Older Teen (16+)
Released: October 2002

Synopsis: “Hideki is thrilled to have a persocom of his own – even if she isn’t as user-friendly as other computers. His friends tell him that Chi is a supercomputer, possibly a legendary Chobit – an AI. That would explain why she acts so human. Maybe a little too human. The more time Hideki spends with Chi, the more it feels like an actual relationship. But as Chi’s feelings for Hideki intensify, she begins to unlock the secrets of her past … secrets that are better left forgotten.”


Volume Four


Manga-ka: CLAMP
Publisher: Tokyopop
Rating: Older Teen (16+)
Released: Febuary 2003

Synopsis: “When Hideki initially found Chi, his persocom companion, he knew that her original owner might one day come looking for her. Now, that moment Hideki feared has finally come to pass, and what happens is completed unexpected. But even as he is in danger of losing Chi, Hideki makes a new friend when he inherits another laptop persocom. Many questions are answered at last, and even more are posed, in the fourth volume of this international smash hit.”


Volume Five


Manga-ka: CLAMP
Publisher: Tokyopop
Rating: Older Teen (16+)
Released: April 2003

Synopsis: “Are a persocom’s memories, stored on a hard drive, real? This question has been driving Hideki mad as he searches for his kidnapped ‘com, Chi. Hideki has always thought that persocoms are just machines, but his heart tells him that there’s something special about Chi. A mysterious duo keeps watch. If Chi’s self-defense mechanism activate again, it could prove even more destructive. The clock is ticking, both in Hideki’s search for Chi and Chi’s search to complete herself.”


Volume Six


Manga-ka: CLAMP
Publisher: Tokyopop
Rating: Older Teen (16+)
Released: June 2003

Synopsis: “Can a person be truly happy with a persocom? Hiroyasu Ueda believed he could be, in fact he fell in love with, and married, his persocom. But one fateful day tragedy struck and Ueda was separated from his true love. It’s often said that persocoms are more perfect than humans; better looking, better thinkers … better lovers, even. Can someone who once loved the perfect (if artificial) woman be fulfilled in a relationship with a mere human?”


Volume Seven


Manga-ka: CLAMP
Publisher: Tokyopop
Rating: Older Teen (16+)
Released: August 2003

Synopsis: “What exactly are Hideki’s feelings towards Chi, his childlike but loyal persocom? When his friend, Minoru, tells Hideki that he’s become attached to his own persocom, Yuzuki, because of who she is, Hideki is forced to confront his own feelings for Chi. He always knew Chi was different from other persocoms, but how and why? What makes her so dangerous? Chi’s mysterious origins are finally exposed in the most revealing episode of Chobits yet!”


Volume Eight


Manga-ka: CLAMP
Publisher: Tokyopop
Rating: Older Teen (16+)
Released: October 2003

Synopsis: “After much soul searching (if a persocom could be said to have a soul) Chi comes to the realization that her feelings towards Hideki are indeed nothing short of love. Only two obstacles stand between her and happiness: Hideki, who’s been struggling with the idea that a person can have feelings for a machine. Can he return her love? Second is the mysterios duo: Zima and Dita. They’re quickly closing in to deactivate Chi before her strong emotions pose a threat to persocoms everywhere.”

About the Author:

Lissa Pattillo is the owner and editor of Kuriousity.ca. Residing in Halifax, Nova Scotia she takes great joy in collecting all manners of manga genres, regretting that there's never enough time in the day to review or share them all. Along with reviews, Lissa is responsible for all the news postings to the website and works full time as a web and graphic designer.



Kuriousity does not condone or support the illegal distribution of manga online.
See an ad here linking to a scanlation website? Please let us know!

One Response

  1. […] 1 of Aqua and Danielle Van Gorder reviews vol. 12 of Nodame Cantabile. Lissa Pattillo reads all of Chobits at Kuri-ousity. Julie looks at vol. 9 of Inubaka: Crazy for Dogs at the Manga Maniac cafe. Sakura […]

Leave a Reply

Take me back to the top!